Making a Meal out of it

by Henry on September 7, 2006

“Making Light”:http://www.nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/ points us to Wikipedia’s “Lamest Edit Wars”:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Lamest_edit_wars which in turn refers to the “epic battle”:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Irish_breakfast over what makes an Irish Breakfast an Irish Breakfast. It’s a lovely example of how Wikipedia should work. The bizarre and repulsive heresies of the fried kidneys and the baked beans are duly anathematized and dispatched into limbo. A blatantly political attempt to assimilate the meal that nourished our fathers under the rubric of the entirely inferior morning repast of the Hated Anglo-Saxon Oppressor is vigorously repelled. And a “harmonious consensus”:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_breakfast finally prevails, which not only correctly identifies the proper constituent parts (sausages, rashers, eggs, mushrooms and black and white puddings), but contains much useful information (e.g. Iarnrod Eireann breakfasts, the great expense of) for the interested inquirer.

These are serious matters. When in Belfast, one of my uncles once spotted a colleague declining to partake of the Ulster Fry that was provided for breakfast, and instead ordering muesli – _with skim milk_. He knew at once that the man wasn’t to be trusted.

For the record

by John Quiggin on September 7, 2006

Most of us have seen the picture of Rumsfeld shaking hands with Saddam in the mid-1980s, but my recollections of the extent of Republican support for Saddam at that time have always been a bit cloudy.

Saddam and Rumsfeld

This piece by Peter Galbraith, a former US ambassador to Croatia, gives chapter and verse.

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Entertainment!

by Scott McLemee on September 7, 2006

Over the weekend, Political Theory Daily Review linked to a recent essay on the Gang of Four. (The band, that is. Not the group in power in China thirty years ago this month, and in jail thirty years ago next month.) The title indicated it would treat the band’s work as Marxist cultural theory. Not in terms of, mind you, but as. Good call: The Gang’s lyrics were always very explicit about reification, class consciousness, and whatnot. No ex post facto Zizekian-epigone hijinks necessary, thank you very much. Makes its own gravy! A critic who understood that from the start might go far.

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