Interesting citations

by Henry on December 20, 2006

I’m buried in grading at the moment (like, I suspect, many of our readers), and not up to writing any longwinded posts. But I did come across something that I thought might make for an interesting discussion for the academic types who want to take a few minutes out. A vanity search on Google Scholar revealed that a piece (PDF) that I co-wrote with Jack Knight a few years back had been cited in an article by Pieter Tierhost for the Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie on “The Scaling of the Dutch Vegetables-Under-Glass-Cluster: Sweet Peppers, Tomatoes and Cucumbers.” Now it isn’t quite as odd as it might sound that Tierhost would cite an article by a political scientist and political theorist; there’s an actual connection there (and Tierhost’s article looks like an interesting and valuable take on industrial clusters for those who follow these debates). But I certainly never thought that anything I wrote would be of interest to scholars debating the cooperation strategies of Dutch vegetable-growers. Which leads to a point for discussion by those of our readers as gets cited occasionally – what’s the most surprising venue/field/article that you’ve been cited in?

{ 8 comments }

1

Otto Pohl 12.20.06 at 5:10 pm

A conference paper I gave at the 2001 ASN Conference at Columbia University on the deportation of Russian-Germans by Stalin got cited in a medical journal. Vol. 16, no. 4 of _The European Journal of Public Health_ has an article by Catherine Kyobutungi et al citing my paper, “The Deportation and Destruction of the German Minority in the USSR.” To be fair the title of their article is “Mortality from External Causes among Ethnic German Immigrants from former Soviet Union Countries, in Germany.” Still I do not think too many medical journal articles cite conference papers written by historians.

2

Otto Pohl 12.20.06 at 5:10 pm

A conference paper I gave at the 2001 ASN Conference at Columbia University on the deportation of Russian-Germans by Stalin got cited in a medical journal. Vol. 16, no. 4 of _The European Journal of Public Health_ has an article by Catherine Kyobutungi et al citing my paper, “The Deportation and Destruction of the German Minority in the USSR.” To be fair the title of their article is “Mortality from External Causes among Ethnic German Immigrants from former Soviet Union Countries, in Germany.” Still I do not think too many medical journal articles cite conference papers written by historians.

3

Ben 12.20.06 at 5:53 pm

I’ve never been published academically, but I did once find a local unsigned band were quoting something I said about them in a student newspaper review on their website.

4

harry b 12.20.06 at 6:17 pm

I was once cited by Stephen Pollard, approvingly, in a public debate he had with my dad.

A passage from an article I wrote criticising one of New Labour’s 1997 plegdes was once used, word for word and approvingly but without attribution, in a speech by the person who claimed culpability for said pledge (and was thus being self-critical). I was very impressed.

5

Seth Edenbaum 12.20.06 at 11:55 pm

Considering the’re all for one article I wrote at the age of 22 and that I thought was forgotten (until Amazon started listing citations) every single one!

6

PG 12.21.06 at 1:00 am

“Farming Made Her Stupid,” in Hypatia (which bills itself as “the only journal for scholarly research at the intersection of philosophy and women’s studies”). I’m doubtful that the article qualifies as “scholarly research,” given that it’s semi-reliant on a blogpost, and the author thinks “The Simple Life” was mocking the country folks rather than the moronic urban princesses. How do people manage to write about pop culture while knowing so little about it?

7

Rob St. Amant 12.21.06 at 12:00 pm

A paper I wrote for a small conference in the area of artificial intelligence and computer graphics a few years ago was cited in a Ph.D. dissertation this past year from a clinical psychology department. An odd connection.

8

Eszter 12.21.06 at 12:47 pm

This is not a surprising citation given the link in topics, but it was still a pleasant surprise for me generally speaking.

In October, 2000, Wired hosted a debate between Ralph Nader and Reed Hundt (advisor to Al Gore) about technology policy. Reed Hundt cited my work:

“And even if Al Gore did not write the software or dig the trenches, it is true that more than any other single public official he is responsible for the new political economy of the Internet. According to a recent study by Princeton University sociology professor Eszter Hargittai, one of the primary causes of the spread of the Internet in any country is the competition policy of that country. Al Gore personally led the administration’s successful effort to pass the 1996 Telecommunications Act. That law substituted for monopolized markets the most robustly competitive communications markets of any large, developed country.”

I was a grad student at the time so being referred to as a prof added an extra bit of amusement.

Later, Hundt cited my piece again in a Senate Judiciary Hearing. By then I had let him know that I was not a prof so that part of the reference changed.

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